The activated unit flew Lockheed F-94B aircraft during the Korean War as local interceptors. One F-94B
photograph reveals the call number FA-393.
On December 1, 1952 the unit was re-designated the 142nd
Fighter Bomber Squadron, and reverted to propeller-driven aircraft, the F-51H "Mustang" supplemented by
a few T-6 trainers.
Aircraft Serial Numbers, Delaware Air National Guard

This listing is incomplete, but thanks to Ed Blackburn for researching this data, and making it his
mission.

For the first three months of the 142nd Fighter Squadron and its supporting Utility Flight training was
completely in ground school, familiarization, record keeping, and maintenance. Lt. Col. Wallace
Cameron, squadron commander was credited with the first flight in the AT-6 Texan on November 14,
1946  On December 13, 1946, two L-5Gs and a second AT-6 training aircraft were received to assist in the
training of new pilots. "After it (L-5G) came in, I was one of the only ones if not the only one, who had
ever flown anything like it. So Billy Livergood and I took it up and flew it around", said
Clarence E.
Atkinson.  Unfortunately, we do not have serial numbers for the L-5s.
Aircraft
Type
Serial
Number
Pilot
Crew Chief
Notes
AT-6D
42-86357
Capt. J. E. Somerville
   
AT-6D
42-86067
Lt. P.E. Geisel
   
AT-6C
42-44044
Joe Gibson
   
AT-6D
44-81192
Charles Hogue
  Accident July 9, 1949 Phila.Taxiing
AT-6D
44-81403
Capt. A. T. Thawley
   
AT-6D
44-81588
Lt. H. R. Stowell
   
AT-6D
44-81768
Capt. C.E. Atkinson
   
T-6C
48-1351
     
T-6G
52-8219
Capt. P. Lewis
   
Aircraft
Type
Serial
Number
Pilot
Crew Chief
Notes
F-47N
44-88757
Chas. R. Hearn Jr.
   
F-47N
44-89255
Robert J. Byrne
   
F-47N
44-89339
James Shotwell
   
F-47N
44-89350
William Livergood
  Fatal crash May 13, 1949, New Castle
F-47N
44-89354
Lawrence Gibson
   
F-47N
44-89371
     
F-47N
44-89400
     
F-47N
44-89404
Wallace B.
McCafferty
   
F-47N
44-89448
David McCallister
   
F-47N
44-92081
Robert P. Kemske
   
F-47N
45-50024
Donald Christ
   
F-47N
45-50034
    Photo credit Ernie Bosetti "USAF Plus Fifteen", by David
W. Menard
F-47N
45-50065
George Dunn
   
F-47N
45-50094
  Vincent Riley
 
F-47N
45-50096
Frank H. Stern Jr.
   
Aircraft
Type
Serial
Number
Pilot
Crew Chief
Notes
F-86A
48-131
    June 1954-Nov.1956
F-86A
49-1012
Frank Stern
A. Goodson
March 1954-Sep 1956, "Canned Heat" left
gun panel
F-86A
49-1015
    April 1954 -Oct. 1956, "The Duchess 5th
Verse"
F-86A
49-1018
    April 1954-Nov. 1956
F-86A
49-1020
    June 1954-Nov. 1956
F-86A
49-1028
    March 1954-April 1956
F-86A
49-1117
D. McCallister
E.Whitten
12 Mar. 1954-Apr. 1955, First F-86 in unit,
first "Cindee Lind 6th"
F-86A
49-1142
D. McCallister
Armand Piazza
Apr 1954-Mar 1957, A/C had 2 kills in
Korea, second "Cindee Lind 6th"
F-86A
49-1169
James Shotwell
K.B. Powers
Mar 1954-Mar 19, 1955 (crash-pilot killed)
"Fyne Type", "With Character" left gun panel
F-86A
49-1208
Robtert Floyd
Newt Brackin
July 1954-April 1956, "Lonely Skunk" on left
gun panel
F-86A
49-1259
John Sumerfield
  Apr 1954-Nov. 1956
F-86A
49-1285
Frank Stern
  Lost Aug 12, 1954, Pilot killed
F-86A
49-1303
J.P. Scott II
Paul Smith
Apr 1954-Oct. 1955 Damaged in crash
piloted by T. White Aug 1955
The first of twelve F-86A Sabrejets (Ser. no. 49-1117) arrived at New Castle on March 12, 1954 flown by
Maj. John A. McKay from Warner Robins AFB Georgia. It became the "Cindy Lind 6th" assigned to  
Major David McCallister, 142nd Squadron Commander.  He switched mounts to serial number 49-1
142,
which became the second  "CindyLind 6th" about a month later, on its arrival.  This aircraft was credited
with two MIG kills during the Korean War.

In September 1954 the unit received a new remanufactured
C-45H Twin Beechcraft Ser. No. 52-10871
aircraft to carry the governor and other dignitaries on state missions as an executive aircraft, as well as a
trainer for instrument and multi-engine proficiency. Flown to the "Boneyard" on 28 June 1960 by
Spruance, Staulcup and McGovern. Transferred to the Military Assistance Program in Jan. 1961.
The mission aircraft, F-47N Thunderbolts were reported on January 7, 1947 to arrive within two to three
weeks.  The first three would be flown from Hill Field in Ogden Utah. They were followed by a further 14
fighter aircraft, reported on January 9 to arrive within a week or ten days also from Hill field, and one
C-47A transport on January 18.  The first two F-47Ns actually arrived on Saturday February 1. They
were practically brand new with only 25 hours on the aircraft. The P-47N was designed for use over the
vast expanses of the Pacific Ocean and was the largest single place fighter ever used by the Army Air
Force.
Primarily a fighter-bomber squadron, the unit also acquired the first of four  B-26 Invader Attack
Bombers (formerly A-26) on March 5, 1947, from Warner-Robins Field in Dalton Georgia.  The Invaders
were mostly used for target towing. 1947 brought the addition of several more airplanes including
another C-47.  The total complement was four B-26s, two L-5s, two AT-6s, two C-47s and 25 F-47 aircraft
when the squadron was up to full strength on June 1, 1947.
Aircraft
Type
Serial
Number
Pilot
Crew Chief
Notes
C-47
43-30648
    (c/n 13799)
C-47
43-30691
Wm. Spruance
Harry Staulcup
  (c/n 13842)
B-26
43-9462
     
B-26
43-4117
     
Just one year prior to being mobilized  for 21 months of Korean War service, the Delaware ANG
received their first jets; F-84C's in February 1950, ferried in from Otis AFB Massachusetts.  At the time,
it was one of the very first ANG units to "go jet". With the single exception of
Major David McCallister,
none of the pilots in the unit had ever flown a jet. Two squadron pilots, Captain Frank H. Stern and
James R. Shotwell were away at Williams AFB learning to master the F-80 Shooting Star but had not
yet returned from school. Lt. Howard "Bus" Schuckler recalls being planted in the seat, told how to
'light the burner" and then took off for a solo as his first training session in the new jet.
Aircraft
Type
Serial
Number
Pilot
Crew Chief
Notes
F-84C
F-84C
47-1532
47-1528
     
F-84C
47-1535
Charles Hogue
   
F-84C
47-1545
     
F-84C
47-1558
     
F-84C
47-1581
James Shotwell
   
F-84C
F-84C
47-1587
47-1580
     
Aircraft
Type
Serial
Number
Pilot
Crew Chief
Notes
F-51H
44-64426  
Lt. A. J. Florio
   
F-51H
44-64428
Capt. W. A. Hannum
   
F-51H
44-64536
Capt. J.V. Schobelock
   
F-51H
44-64457
Capt. F. H. Stern, Jr.
   
F-51H
44-64169
Lt. T. W. White
   
F-51H
44-64599
Capt. W. C. Miller
   
The 142nd upgraded from North American F-86A to F-86E model Sabrejets in early 1956.
Aircraft
Type
Serial
Number
Pilot
Crew Chief
Notes
F-86E
51-12979
Linford Robbins
Paul Lane
Mar.1956 -Crashed in May 1957 killing pilot
F-86E
51-12989
J.P. Scott II
A1C Walbert
McCoy
 
F-86E
51-13003
D. McCallister
William
Roberts
Feb. 1956-Jan. 1958, "Cindee Lind 7th", won
1956 Ricks Trophy Race
F-86E
51-13005
    July 1956-Oct. 1957
F-86E
51-13018
Walt Hannum
Wm. Craig
March 1956-Nov. 1957, "Locomotion"
F-86E
51-13028
    Feb.1956-Oct. 1957
F-86E
51-13033
    June 1956-Dec.1957
F-86E
51-13036
Robert Floyd
Paul Shotwell
Feb.1956-Jan.1958, Skunk "Lonely II" on
right gun panel
F-86E
51-13039
Ernie Bosetti
Bill Jackson
Mar. 1956-Oct. 1957
F-86E
51-13041
T. White
  Feb.1956- Oct. 1957
F-86E
51-13043
Richard Byrne
  Perished 6 July 1955, Nellis AFB Nevada
F-86E
51-13045
Donald
Hollingsworth
  Jan 1956-Oct. 1957
F-86E
51-13065
    Feb.1956-Oct. 1957
F-86E
51-13067
Don Renshaw
  Mar 1956-Jan. 1958
F-86E
51-13069
Jerry Luce
Armand Piazza
Jan. 1956-Oct. 1957, "Iron Mistress II" Last
F-86E manufactured
Aircraft
Type
Serial
Number
Pilot
Crew Chief
Notes
F-86F
51-13081
R.J. White
Paul Lane
June 1957-Dec. 1957
F-86F
51-13106
    Aug 1957-Sep 1957
F-86F
51-13114
    Aug 1957-Oct. 1957
F-86F
51-13155
D. McCallister
C.T. Lee
June 1957-Nov. 1957, "Cindee Lind 8th"
The most short-lived aircraft were the unit's F-86F models which were only in use for about six months
before being replaced by F-86Hs.
Aircraft
Type
Serial
Number
Pilot
Crew Chief
Notes
F-86H
52-5737
Richard Murphy
Ed Eicholz
Nov. 1957-Jun 1962, Museum status,
Display Burlington NJ Veteran's Park,
F-86H
52-5744
Joe Pogue
Jim Gestwicki
Nov. 1957-Aug 1962
F-86H
52-5746
Art Gorman
Geo. Horchler
Nov. 1957-Aug 1962
F-86H
52-5747
Joe Cael
Ray Whitzel
Nov. 1957-Aug. 1962, On display Langley
AFB painted as 53-1483
F-86H
53-1249
Robt. Ward
Ron Hill
Nov. 1957-Aug 1962, Sorocco New Mexico
Blue Canyon Site Institute of Mining and
Technology
F-86H
53-1250
Jack Taylor
Dick Harada
Sep 1959-June 1962, Replaced 53-1377,
Museum status, Eaden Prairie Minn,
Flying Cloud Airport
F-86H
53-1253
Dick Simon
Tucker Pierce
Oct. 1957-June 1962, Museum status,
Display Jamestown North Dakota
F-86H
53-1255
Walt Hannum
Jack Weber
Nov. 1957-June 1962, Museum status, Fort
Lauderdale Broward Community College
under restoration at Homestead AFB
F-86H
53-1269
Jerry Luce
A. Piazza
Nov. 1957-Jul 1962
F-86H
53-1272
Paul Lukens
Don
Galbraith
Nov. 1957-Dec 1962, Museum status,
Display Harlem New York 118th St. & 5th
Ave.
F-86H
53-1273
Carl Lewis
Bob Garvey
Nov. 1957-Feb. 1962
F-86H
53-1296
D. McCallister
Bill Jackson
Oct. 1957-Feb. 1962 "Cindy Lynn 9th",
Museum status, New Castle DE
F-86H
53-1301
Red White/Col Bart
(AF Advisor)
Ernie Antes
Dec 1957-Feb 1962
F-86H
53-1309
Bob White
Paul Lane
Nov. 1957-June 1962
F-86H
53-1352
Jay Tethers
Vito Amoroso
Dec 1958-Jan 1962, Wright Patterson AFB
Museum skin removed to reveal internals
F-86H
53-1354
Stan Hopperstead
Ed Betley
Oct. 1957-Apr. 1962
F-86H
53-1359
Gordon Scott
Ed Blackburn
Nov 1957-Jan 1963, Museum status,
Display Argyle Wisconsin
F-86H
53-1360
Bob Floyd
Newt Brackin
Nov 1957-Aug 1962
F-86H
53-1370
Ernie Bosetti
Townsend
Johnson
Oct. 1957-June 1962, Museum status, On
display outside Sheriffs Office Goldsboro
NC
F-86H
53-1372
Lee Casey
Bob Hill
Dec 1957-May 1962, Museum status, On
display Hettinger ND
F-86H
53-1377
Wm. Hutchison
Dick Harada
Oct. 1957-Sep 1958, "Ole Ger" Destroyed
Dover AFB, Engine failure (pilot Tom
Nale)
F-86H
53-1402
Wm Hutchison/Jack
Taylor
Joe Jenicke
Oct 1957-Mar 1962
F-86H
53-1410
Mike Rzucidlo
C.T. Lee
Oct. 1957-June 1962, Sorocco New Mexico
Blue Canyon Site Institute of Mining and
Technology,
F-86H
53-1501
John Schobelock
John Quigley
Dec 1957-May 1962, On Display, Mid
America Air Museum Liberal KS
F-86H
53-1514
James P. Scott II
SSgt Walbert
McCoy
"Joan Marie, Hutn Hutn", on left gun
panel, Oct. 1957-Jul 1962
F-86H
53-1524
Frank Wooten
Paul Shotwell
Nov. 1957-June 1962, Sorocco New Mexico
Runway Site, Institute of Mining and
Technology
The F-86A, E, and F were evolutionary improvements on the original design of the Sabre.  The F-86H
"Sabre Hog"  was a radical re-design with more power, a clamshell canopy, 20mm cannons, and a deeper
fuselage.  The Delaware Air Guard flew this model far longer than any of the previous Sabres.
On April 7, 1962 the Delaware Air National Guard enlarged to "group status" as the 166th Air Transport
Group and was reassigned from the Tactical Air Command to the Military Air Transport Service. The
Delaware Air National Guard gave up its
F-86 jets for the four-engine C-97 Boeing "Stratofreighter," a
long-distance strategic airlift plane. The following data was assembled by Ed Blackburn and Dave Speer.
Aircraft
Type
Serial Number
Crew Chief
Notes
C-97G
0-22612
John Crowley
To Davis-Monthan Apr 7, 1971.  Sold to Israel AF
as civil registration 4X-FPT, military serial
unknown
C-97G
0-22655
Townsend Johnson
Gear-up accident at New Castle, scrappped
C-97G
0-22717
Ed Blackburn
To Davis-Monthan, 2 Feb 1971, Prior Utah ANG
C-97G
0-22729
Forrest Wooten,
Chester Field
To Davis-Monthan, Jun 1969 and dropped from
inventory as surplus. To Southwestern Alloy,
Tucson, AZ Oct 1973 and scrapped.
C-97G
0-22732
Joe McGovern
To Davis-Monthan, To MASDC Apr 15, 1971
C-97G
0-22832
David Speer
Replaced by 921;To Davis-Monthan, Prior Dover
AFB 11thARS
C-97G
0-22898
Frank Hyde,
Newt Brackin
To Davis-Monthan
C-97G
0-20921
David Speer
From Ft. Worth; To Davis-Monthan Had air
condition and new radar system, replaced 0-22832
To MASDC Mar 24, 1971
C-97G
0-20928
Ed Blackburn,
Jay Blake
To Davis-Monthan, To MASDC Mar 23, 1971
C-97G
0-20929
Ernie Antes
To Davis-Monthan Had passenger configuration,
To MASDC as CH0505 Jun 23, 1971
C-97G
0-20938
Paul Lane
To Davis-Monthan, To MASDC Apr 7, 1971
C-97G
0-30346
Townsend Johnson
Replaced 655, To Spain, Spanish Air Force
As the Vietnam war wound down Delaware got the benefit of an aircraft the war had helped to make
famous, as a “Jack of all trades” airlifter. On May 12, 1971 the Delaware ANG changed its name from the
166th Military Airlift Group to the 166th Tactical Airlift Group and replaced its C-97s with the legendary
C-130A "Hercules" prop-jet cargo plane, and began the transition from the Military Airlift Command to
the Tactical Airlift Command. The mission changed from Strategic worldwide airlift to Tactical Airlift,
supporting troops on the ground.  Special thanks to Ray Holder, Ed Blackburn and Tom Lauppe for
providing details below:
Aircraft Type
Serial Number
Notes
C-130H
84-206
17 Oct 1985
C-130H
84-207
18 Oct 1985, Damaged by tornado 28 Sept 2004, repaired
C-130H
84-208
25 Oct 1985, Blown into C-130H 84-0212 by tornado Sep 28, 2004,
Severely damaged, but was repaired. Now has "Senior Hunter"
sigint/elint fit
C-130H
84-209
13 Nov 1985
C-130H
84-210
27 Nov 1985
C-130H
84-211
12 Dec 1985 - 28 Sep 2004. Torn from tiedown and blown across ramp
by tornado. Nose and starboard undercarriage collapsed, starboard
wingtip damaged and fuselage apparently twisted.  Written off and
stripped for spares. Parts used to build 84-207, 84-208, 84-212,
C-130H
84-212
12 Dec 1985, Blown into C-130H 84-0208 by tornado Sep 28, 2004.
Severely damaged but repaired.
C-130H
84-213
7 Jan 1986, TSgt Scott Nybakken, Crew Chief, see article below
C-130H
89-1055
15 Mar 1995
C-130H
90-1057
 
Delaware Air National Guard Aircraft 1946- Present

Stinson L-5 Sentinel                          1946-1950
North American AT-6 Texan            1946-1956
Republic F-47N Thunderbolt             1947-1950
Douglas B-26 Invader                         1947-1950
Douglas C-47 Skytrain                       1947-1960
Republic F-84C Thunderjet                 1950-1951
Lockheed F-94B Starfire                      1951-1952
North American F-51H Mustang       1952-1954
Beechcraft C-45 Expeditor                  1954-1960
Lockheed T-33 Shooting Star             1954-1962
North American F-86A Sabrejet         1954-1956
North American F-86E Sabrejet         1956-1957
North American F-86F Sabrejet         1957
North American F-86H Sabrejet        1957-1962
Boeing C-97G Stratofreighter            1962-1971
Lockheed C-130A Hercules                1971-1985
Lockheed C-130H Hercules               1985-present
Aircraft
Type
Serial
Number
Crew Chief
Notes
C-130A
54-1635
Roger
Demers
"Roman Nose", One of the originals, Delivered to the Air Force on 18
May 1957. Converted to NC-130A, (flight test operations) later
deconverted to C-130A.   At DE ANG Oct. 1979 to Oct. 1985. To
Honduras AF as FAH560.  Stored at Toncontin, Honduras as of Feb
2003.
C-130A
56-0483
Ed
Blackburn
Served at DE ANG July 1971-November 1972. Transferred to Vietnam
Air Force when U.S. Forces left. 483 (c/n 182-3091) to SVAF.  Returned
to USAF.  To Peruvian Air Force as FAP-374?. Scrapped at Lima.
Cockpit preserved, on display at Peruvian Air Force Group 8 base,
Lima international airport.
C-130A
56-0487
Newt
Brackin
Served at DE ANG December 1972-May 1986. 487 (c/n 182-3095)
converted to AC-130A, back to C-130A. Stored at Maranza AZ late
1989, then multiple registrations, 9J-AFV, N6585H, N120TG, XA-RYZ,
N487UN, 9J-RTM
C-130A
56-0493
  493 was never a Delaware plane. It was a  special mod plane that never
worked, so it was de-modified.  493 (c/n 182-3101) to JC-130A,
(temporary flight test operations) then to RC-130S, (surveillance) back
to C-130A.  To AMARC as CF0089 May 1990.
C-130A
56-0494
Richard
Ferrara
Served at DE ANG Aug 1975-September 1985. The US flag was painted
on 494 while on a Panama rotation. I had instructions from above to
have it on for  a humanitarian mission.  Jerry Virden and Tom Murphy
did the paint job. Had a lot of pressure to remove it when we got
home. BUT,being what we were at that time ,we ignored it till PDM.I
have pictures being applied and the finished product. We were all
proud to have OUR FLAG on OUR AIRCRAFT. - Ed Blackburn

Regarding the American flag painted on 494.  That was done while we
(Tom Lauppe and crew) were staying in Nicaragua flying flood relief
missions out of the Managua mil/civilian airport up to Waspam, a dirt
strip of maybe 3500' on the border with Honduras just south of the Rio
Coco River.  We ran a couple of shuttles over 2 or 3 days after big time
power struggles between the Nicaraguan military and civilian
authorities.  We started engines and shut down many times as one
group approved the flight and the other cancelled it before we even
taxied out for takeoff.  We were in another A Model and it may even
have been from another Air Guard unit but probably one of our own.  
Hopefully I can find that flight in my records.  We knew the guys back
at Howard AFB were painting the flag on 494 because we expected to
return to Howard, change planes (to 494) and then we (or another
crew) would return to fly more missions to Waspam.  Never happened.
 We (John Gordon in particular) had a little trouble with men in
military uniforms at Waspam and strongly suspected they were Cuban
military advisors.  Bigtime unfriendly. We never returned to the grass
LZ-type strip.  People lived there in homes built on stilts... due to
flooding I suppose.  Worse case of chigger bites I've ever had in my life
as Duffy and I deplaned while engines were running to take a couple of
pictures of the offload.  The outboard engines hung over tall grass
since the runway (now clear of livestock) was so narrow.  We walked
around (outside of) the running engines/props through the grass and
unknowlingly got hundreds of chiggers in our clothing (flight suit
and fatigues).  It was either 1979 or 1980.  The people with us were:
myself-pilot, John Gordon-copilot, McCaughey-Nav, Jimmy Jones-FE,
Jim Boyce-LM, Duffy-Crewchief, John Crowley-as I recall,
Broomall-"supply officer" (bogus job description in order to let an Intel
Officer witness first hand the Cuban personnel onsite).  There may
have been 1 or 2 more but can't recall.  Lanahan was at Howard as
Mission Commander.

To AMARC as CF0100 Oct 28, 1991.  To battle damage repair trainer
1995-1999.  Still on AMARC inventory Jan 15, 2008.
C-130A
56-0495
Jim Colbert
A/C received from Vietnamese Air Force at end of War.  To South
Vietnam AF Nov 1972, back to USAF by July 1973. To 166th May 1975.
To 164th  Memphis October 1985. To AMARC as CF0097 Aug 28, 1991.
C-130A
56-0497
Ken Mann
RC-130S (surveillance) reconfigured back to C-130A - had additional
inboard fuel cells and 4 A/C generators. Ed Blackburn was sent by Col.
Ralph Piazza as the engineer to pick up 56-497. It was at Hayes,Int. in
PDM, Birmingham,Al. The aircraft was a special mission aircraft. I
think a C-130S. It had additional wing fuel tanks like a B model and
4-a/c  generators. I got a quick briefing on the operations and with Col
Wooding as the pilot flew her home.  497 was the airborne flash-light,
one of one  called a bias-hunter some unit in Texas flew it. It went to
PDM and was de-modded, then Delaware got it.  It was originally built
as a special, non-airdrop C130A as I recall (Lauppe).  My memory is
that it was a light ship with super strong (millions of candle power)
spotlights.  Thought to have been converted in Apr 1972 to an airdrop
capable aircraft in order to be sent to the DANG in Mar, 1974.. It is
now at Ft. Benning GA as a static plane.  497 (c/n 182-3105) to
JC-130A, then to RC-130S, back to C-130A.  To AMARC as CF0067 Apr
1987.  To ZF0002 Dec 1988. To Hunter AAF/Ft. Stewart, GA Feb 1989
as ground trainer.
C-130A
56-0511
Ernie Antes
To 166TAG January 1972. To 139th TAG July 1985. 511 (c/n 182-3119)
to Hemet Valley Flying Service as N132FF in 1992 for use as water
bomber/chemical spray aircraft.  To Aero Firefighting Service in 1997.  
Stored at Memorial Field, Chandler, AZ.  Registration     N121TG
reserved May 11, 2007, Taken up Jun 23, 2007
C-130 A
56-0512
David Speer
To 166th November 1972.  512 (c/n 182-3120) to MASDC as CF0007
May 20, 1976.  Converted to ground trainer as GC-130.  Seen at Paul
Garber facility of NASM.
C-130A
56-0523
John C.  
Crowley
A/C received from Vietnamese Air Force at the end of the war (April
1971). Were told at one time 523 was painted all black. We noted this in
the tail. To 133rd TAW April 1973. 523 (c/n 182-3131) to AMARC as
CF0082 Mar 7, 1990.
C-130A
56-0542
Dave Speer
Silver 542 was the first Delaware C-130A received (Feb.1972)  Dave
Speer parked it on a Thursady night around 6pm. Anyone that
worked on 542 knows about the red covers on the switches on the FE's
panel We never knew why, some  crew chief must have added them.  
Transferred  to Vietnam Air Force when U. S. Forces withdrew. 542
(c/n 182-3150) to South Vietnam AF.  W/o Apr 1975 with SVAF
C-130A
56-0543
George
Horchler/
Mike
Maykut
"The Enterprise",  543 (c/n 182-3151) to South Vietnam AF.  Returned to
USAF.  To 166th November 1975.To 118th TAW Mar 1984. To AMARC
as CF0080 Oct 25, 1989.
C-130A
56-0544
Ernie Antes
To 166th July 1971. Went to West Virginia from Delaware August 1972.
544 (c/n 182-3152) to AMARC as CF0084 Mar 27, 1990.
C-130A
56-0551
Joe Ironside
then John
Crowley
To 166th July 1971.  To 167th TAG August 1972.  523 and Silver 551
belonged to John Crowley and both required extra aileron trim to fly
straight.  542 and 551 came to us in silver.   Silver birds had those gear
door sticks (red)  Ed Blackburn had them removed then the H's came.
56-0551 went on a Panama rotation once and flew every day and
returned with no write-ups. 551 (c/n 182-3159) to Peruvian Air Force.
Sold to Chad Air Force as TT-PAC. W/o Nov 16, 1987.
C-130A
57-0471
Townsend
Johnson,
Ed
Blackburn,
Dave Speer
To 166th April 1971.  To 139th TAG October 1985471 (c/n 182-3178) to
GC-130 ground trainer at Sheppard AFB
C-130A
57-0484
Richard
Ferrara
To 166th August 1975. To 109th TAG October 1975DE ANG had
possession only about two months.  484 (c/n 182-3191) to to MASDC
as CF0047.  To Peruvian Air Force as FAP-383.  Broken up by Aug 1993
C-130A
/D
57-0485
  Originally a ski-equipped C-130D deployed to Greenland and
Christchurch New Zealand.  DE ANG had possession only about five
months. June-Oct 1975  485 (c/n 182-3192) to MASDC as CF0011 May
25, 1976.  Now on display at Minnesota ANG Museum, painted as
55-0016, which was lost in Vietnam
C-130B
    DE ANG also had a C-130B assigned in 1990-1991. It was a parts bird.
Delaware never flew it    It was left on the ramp when we deployed in
January 1991.
Info on some of the C130A models that were in the Delaware ANG 1971 through 1985
From:
http://www.utdallas.edu/library/collections/speccoll/Leeker/c130.pdf
(Air America aircraft)
THIS INFO WAS CURRENT AS OF 23 AUG 2010 PER THE WEBPAGE, (Thanks to Tom Lauppe for
passing this along.)

Air America’s “Project” C-130s used for military cargo flown into Laos 1965-71:

Lockheed C-130A 57000471 3178 mid-65? ex 483rd TCW, Naha
Service history: to the 21st TCS, Naha, on 25 June 60 as 57-471; transferred to the control of the 4440th
Aircraft Delivery Group, Langley AFB, Virginia, on 30 October 60, possibly for modifications; returned to
the 21st TCS, Naha, on 22 January 61; probably to E-Flight in November 61; transferred to a special
service within the 21st TCS, Naha, on 31 July 62; transferred to 315th AD Headquarters, Naha, on 31
October 62; current on 1 July 64; still used by the 21st TCS; between 1961 and 1965, all maintenance had
been done at Naha, but on 15 February 65, the ship was transferred to the USAF’s Facility Checking
Squadron, St. Petersburg, FL, from where it returned to 315th AD Headquarters, Naha, on 24 May 65;
believed to have been flown with Air America since the second half of 1965 until early 1966;18
transferred to the 51st Fighter Interceptor Wing, Naha, for maintenance on 10 February 66; returned to
the 315th AD, Headquarters, Naha, on 16 March 66; transferred to the USAF’s Facility Checking
Squadron, St. Petersburg, FL, on 21 June 66 for WK-maintenance; returned on 16 August 66 and
transferred to the 374th TCW, Naha, the same day; in the beginning of 1967, the ship commuted
frequently between Naha and Cam Ranh Bay; but since 19 April 67, it remained at Naha; between 17 and
28 July 67, the ship was transferred to the 51st Fighter Interceptor Wing, Naha, for maintenance; the
Wing became the 374th TAW, Naha, on 31 December 67; sent to Lockheed Martin Aircraft Center,
Greenville, SC, for overhaul on 2 December 68; became 57000471 in 68 (?); delivered back to the 374th
TAW, Naha, from Lockheed Martin Aircraft Center, Greenville, SC, on 17 March 69, back in service (CA)
with them on 28 March 69; transferred to the 51st Fighter Interceptor Wing, Naha, between 15 and 28
November 69 for maintenance; returned from F2-service, that is probably from Air America, on 13
January 70 (70013), on 28 February 70 (70059), and on 8 June 70 (70159); transferred to the 51st Fighter
Interceptor Wing, Naha, between 7 and 19 October 70 (70280-92) for VK-maintenance.
Fate: departed to the 142nd TAS, Greater Wilmington Airport, DE, on 5 April 71 (71095, that is much
later than the other 374th TAW C-130As); used at Sheppard AFB as maintenance ground trainer in
October 89 and still in September 96.

Lockheed C-130A
56000523 3131 11 April 70 ex 374th TAW, Naha
Service history: transferred to the 374th TCW in August 66; in 1969, 56000523 was still one of the regular
374th TAW aircraft, rotating between Naha and Tan Son Nhut until 2 January 70; on 18 January 70, it
was delivered to Hayes Aircraft Industries, Birmingham, AL, for maintenance; WK-maintenance was
done by Hayes between 24 January and 2 April 70; on 2 April 70, it was redelivered to the 374th TAW,
Naha, reentering CA-service on 11 April 70; transferred to E-Flight/21st TAS/374th TAW, Naha,23
probably on 11 April 70, as a replacement aircraft for the ill-fated 56000510, which had crashed with Air
America on 10 April 70; local maintenance was done by WRAAR, Naha, between 21 and 22 July 70; to F-2
service, that is probably bailed to Air America, on 22 July 70 (70203).
Fate: transferred to the 142nd TAS, Greater Wilmington Airport, DE, on 19 April 71 (71109, that is much
later than the other 374th TAW C-130As); in 1972, it flew with the 96th TAS, Minneapolis; transferred to
AMARC, Davis-Monthan AFB, Tucson, AZ, in March 90 as CF082; still there in October 97.

Lockheed C-130A
56000542 3150 6 July 69 ex 374th TAW, Naha
Service history: in the first half of 1969, 56000542 was still one of the regular 374th TAW aircraft,
rotating between Naha, Tan Son Nhut, and Cam Ranh Bay until 6 July 69; on 6 July 69 (69187), it
entered CA-service from Naha, rotating no longer; so, most probably, it went to E-Flight/21st TAS/374th
TAW, Naha,22 on 6 July 69; on 22 December 69, 56000542 entered VK-service (maintenance) from Naha,
probably with the 51st Fighter Interceptor Wing, Naha, to whom it was officially transferred between
1 and 8 January 70; on 8 January 70, it probably returned to E-Flight/21st TAS/374th TAW, Naha, until 6
May 70 (70126); during this time, it was probably 604 with Air America, used on the refugee airlifts; on 6
May 70, it was delivered to Hayes Aircraft Industries, Birmingham, AL, for IRAN; redelivered to 21st
TAS/374th TAW, Naha, on 22 November 70 (70326), where it entered service on 9 December 70
(70343).
Fate: transferred to the 142nd TAS, Greater Wilmington Airport, DE, on 11 February 71 (71042); given to
the South Vietnamese Air Force in November 72; written off in April 75

Lockheed C-130A
56000551 3159 27 May 70 ex 374th TAW, Naha
Service history: In 1967 with 40th TCS/317th TCW, Lockbourne; to 35th TAS/374th TAW, Naha, on 9
June 68 (68160); rotated between Naha and Cam Ranh Bay until 29 October 68 (68302); transferred to the
51st Fighter Interceptor Wing, Naha, between 17 November and 1 December 68 (68321-35) for
maintenance; no entry for 1969; 374th TAW, Naha, to Hayes Aircraft Industries, Birmingham, AL, on 20
January 70 for overhaul; redelivered to 21st TAS/374th TAW, Naha, on 8 May 70; in service on 9
May 70; to F-2-service on 70208, that is probably bailed to Air America, on 27 July 70; local maintenance
was done at Naha between 25 and 27 July 70; no other movements.24
Fate: transferred to the 142nd TAS, Greater Wilmington Airport, DE, on 20 April 71
(71110, that is much later than the other 374th TAW C-130As); sold to the Chad Air
Force as TT-PAC before August 86; crashed landing in Chad on 16 November 87.

From the end of 1961 until the second half of 1965, the authorization to use C-130s into Laos, given by
President Kennedy in March 61,  was seldom translated into action. In late 1961, E-Flight was established
within the 21st Troop Carrier Squadron / 315th  Air Division at Naha, Okinawa, probably with the two
C-130As remaining from the cargo missions flown into Laos in 1961, that is 56-493 (c/n 3101) and 56-497
(c/n 3105), which were later transferred to the control of the 4440th Aircraft Delivery Group, Langley
AFB, Virginia, on 2 and 9 November 61 respectively. The 21st TCS had officially been attached to
Detachment 1, Headquarters, 315th Air Division, between 25 June 60 and 20 October 64, to the 6315th
Operations Group between 20 October 64 and 7 August 66, and to the 374th  TCW since 8 August 66.

The first real E-Flight C-130As were probably 57-470 (c/n 3177) and 57-471 (c/n 3178), which returned to
the 21st  TCS, Naha, on 5 November 61 and on 22 January 61 respectively. Unlike other C-130As of the
315th AD, the four or five E-Flight C-130As were uncamouflaged. They had very small USAF insignia,
and had skate-wheel rollers installed on the cargo-compartment floor over which cheap wood pallets
could be moved. That made handling easier at locations without forklifts and made it unnecessary to
recover the pallets.                         

See the official squadron history at: http://www.au.af.mil/au/afhra/wwwroot/sqs/0021as.htm. In
September 65, 4 C-130As were staged to Don Muang Royal Thai AFB, Bangkok, to become Detachment 4,
315th  Air Division. They had to conduct shuttle operations within Thailand. In August 66 this number
was reduced to 3 C-130As. The 5 C-130As temporarily based at Kadena, Okinawa, however, were not E-
Flight, but High Gear aircraft. This was a group on continuous ground alert for the airlift of nuclear
weapons in the event of a general war.  However, E-Flight was not only responsible for deliveries into
Laos, but E-Flight aircraft and crews also flew cargo missions over the western Pacific and often made
deliveries at intermediate points during ferry flights from Okinawa to Takhli. So not all four or five E-
Flight aircraft were used by Air America, and between 1961 and 1965, no C-130s seem to have been flown
by Air America crews at all. In June 1965, however, the CIA and the US Embassy at Vientiane
recommended that C-130s should be used for deliveries from Takhli (T-05) into Laos. So, 4 five-man Air
America-crews (including a navigator) were trained to fly the C-130. From the second half of 1965 to the
spring of 1971 Air America used USAF C-130As from Takhli, Thailand to fly large supplies of
ammunition into “forbidden territory under cover of darkness”.

Those flights ended at Long Tieng, Vientiane, Luang Prabang, Sam Thong, Pakse, Savannakhet, or
Saravane. In 1965 the TakhliLong Tieng service (CIA logistic support pipeline) was opened. Since 1967 at
least one of the two C-130As at Takhli flew into Laos every day; and since 69, C-130 missions from
Udorn to Luang Prabang were added. For more details about the C-130A missions flown into Laos by
Air America crews since 17 August 1965, see the file Air America in Laos II – military aid, Part I within
my  History of Air America that can be found at
http://www.utdallas.edu/library/collections/speccoll/Leeker/history/Laos2Part1.pdf .

But unfortunately, the “Aircraft status reports” regularly published by Air America do not list up project
aircraft, and the official USAF Assignment Records, preserved at the AFHRA at Maxwell AFB, AL, in
most cases do not indicate squadrons or smaller units like E-Flight. As to the number of “Project” C-130s
actually flown by Air America, the following is known: Robbins quotes Jim Parrish, who states that in
the mid-sixties, Air America started with four C-130-crews; Bowers states that in 1967 the Company
operated two ships out of Takhli; and a Memorandum by James A. Cunningham, dated 10 October 70,
notes that “we also operate, on a bailed basis, C-130 project aircraft - up to two at a time”.

So the only way to identify the actual E-Flight aircraft, which were uncamouflaged, scheduled and used
entirely separately from the other planes of the larger unit and even outside squadron control (as the
squadron commander exerted direct supervisory authority), is by observation or by looking for those
aircraft which did not participate in the activities of the others like in periodical rotation. In the early days
most Naha-based C-130As rotated to Tachikawa AB, Japan, or to Robins AFB, GA. Between 1967 and
1971 most Naha-based C-130As rotated between Naha, Cam Ranh Bay, and Ubon. And the only way to
identify the C-130As bailed to Air America is by photos or by entries in the log books of those pilots who
flew the aircraft. But possibly Air America started with four C-130-crews in  1965 instead of two, because
two of these:              

The 1965 history of the 315th Air Division contained in microfilm 23820 preserved at the AFHRA at
Maxwell AFB states (p. 6) that in September 1965, 4 USAF C-130As were based at Don Muang airport,
but “as many as five users were forwarding requests for airlift”; one of these on-call customers may have
been Air America.

Crews possibly had to fly the two C-130Es which had been transferred to the CIA in December 64 (64-
0506 and 64-0507). Those aircraft were seen all black in Laos in May 69 and were both reported to have
been written off in South East Asia in February 70.

Other reports say that those two C-130Es belonged to Project  Heavy Chain, which was based at
Norton AFB, California, but operated out of Nha Trang after they had been modified with special
electronics equipment to allow them to operate at low level at night in higher threat areas.

In 1965 there seems to have been even an electronic reconnaissance C-130B-II leased to Air America, as 59-
1531 was officially being worked on at Air Asia’s maintenance facility at Tainan for no less than 9
months. This was the only C-130B-II ever to be officially maintained by Air Asia, and in those early days
USAF aircraft bailed to Air America more than once appeared as “out for maintenance at Tainan” in the
USAF Assignment Records preserved at the AFHRA at Maxwell AFB, AL.  It can only be guessed that
this C-130B-II was possibly used for some covert overflights.
                                                    -----------

I recall the stories about 2 engine out flights by DANG pilots. I think they were before I was checked out
(E to A conversion) in early 1974. Woody and I shut down a number of A Model engines together. I
guess we were 'snake bit.' During my local checkout I flew with Woody a lot (in addition to Hazell, Cael,
Scotty). We had a cnx during a run up due to no torque difference on one engine between dropping
throttles into flt idle and the value after run up after pulling them back to flt idle. The other 3 were fine.
Woody didn't even see it. Also I was much later getting an instrument check from Woody and right after
T/O on rwy 19 we had a prop go crazy out of limits. By then we were talking with PHL Approach
control and couldn't get a word in edge wise to even declare an emergency due to constant chatter on the
frequency. So we just did a 180, switched back to tower freq and declared an emergency. Tower was
pissed because another plane had departed 19 after us and was now a real potential conflict. We saw and
missed it! On shutdown the prop disengaged from the engine trashing the gear box. Slower speed on
final = lower rpm on the prop. No control problem, just a 'standard' 3 engine approach and landing.
Woody was standing behind the pilot seat the whole time and was certain we were jinxed. Worse part?
Had to do the entire checkride over. Enuf 'war stories'. - Tom Lauppe

The Delaware Air National Guard transitioned to newer C-130H's in 1985 and the history for those
aircraft is presented below courtesy CWhite@MA@166TAG  5 Oct 1997:
Aicraft
Type
Serial
Number
Pilot
Crew Chief
Notes
T-33A
51-4197
    Aug.1953-Oct.1956
T-33A
51-4694
D. McCallister
  1953
T-33A
52-9586
    Feb. 1954-Jan.1963
T-33A
53-5955
D. McCallister
  Oct.1955-June1961, McCallister killed in
crash at Scott AFB, Spruance injured
Sometime in the summer of 1953 the first Lockheed T-33A Shooting Star trainer arrived to transition the
unit pilots from F-51's to jets as mission aircraft. the first of these was assigned to Commanding Officer
David McCallister who already had a fair amount of experience flying jets.
Delaware Air Guard C-130 aircraft reaches 10,000 hour flying milestone

by Tech. Sgt. Benjamin Matwey, 166th Airlift Wing, Delaware Air National Guard

7/18/2008 - NEW CASTLE, DELAWARE -- At mid-day June 5, 2008, a C-130 transport aircraft of the
142nd Airlift Squadron, part of the 166th Airlift Wing of the Delaware Air National Guard, flew a
training proficiency flight resulting in the aircraft reaching and breaking 10,000 flying hours. This was a
new milestone for C-130H aircraft flown by the unit for the last 23 years.

Before the flight, C-130 aircraft tail # 213 had 9,998.8 hours of flying time, and was 1.2 hours short of the
10,000 flying hour mark. The flight took off at 10:45 a.m. and landed at 1:12 p.m., making the flight
duration 2.5 hours, and reaching the mark of 10,001.3 total flying hours.

According to Col. Daniel Van Wyk, commander, 166th Maintenance Group, aircraft # 213 has seen duty
in all theaters of combat (including the Pacific Ocean, Africa, Central and South America, the Middle East
and Southwest Asia to include Iraq), and was shot up with ground fire in Afghanistan and repaired in
Portugal over a period of several months. The aircraft has seen combat duty in 1991 in Operation Desert
Storm, and from 2003 until now in Operations Enduring Freedom and Iraqi Freedom. These operations
are in addition to normal training and operational missions flying all over the world. When a tornado
struck the New Castle air base in September 2004, aircraft # 213 was in Afghanistan being flown by
aircrew in combat.

The crew chief for the aircraft is Tech. Sgt. Scott Nybakken, who has worked on C-130 aircraft for 25
years. He has been crew chief on this particular aircraft, tail number # 840213 (commonly referred to as
#213), since 2000. The crew chief is responsible for every aspect of maintenance and performance of the
aircraft, and is the last person to see the aircraft before take off when he salutes the aircraft commander,
and also the first person to greet the aircrew at the landing.

Upon landing, Sgt. Nybakken worked with loadmaster Senior Airman Philip Harris to place chalks
against the tires to secure the aircraft. While performing the post-flight inspection of the aircraft, Sgt.
Nybakken commented on the milestone reached by the aircraft he is responsible for, and said, "It's a great
feeling."

Sergeant Nybakken has been crew chief for the aircraft on numerous missions throughout Southwest
Asia from 2003 forward.

"This milestone highlights the excellent maintenance work performed on these aircraft, and the
proficiency and professionalism of the aircrew that have flown them for over two decades," said Col.
Jonathan Groff, commander, 166th Airlift Wing.

One Airman working on the ground in base flight operations to monitor the flight remarked of the
aircraft reaching 10,000 hours. He said, "It's a good deal of aluminum, and a great many hours."

The Delaware Air Guard unit has gone 45 years without a flight mishap, and in June 2007 surpassed
160,000 accident-free flight hours, operating two different aircraft: the C-97 Stratofighter until retirement
in 1985, and the currently assigned C-130 Hercules. The wing has completed 17 years of combat airlift
operations in Southwest Asia and has an operations tempo that currently logs an average one million
miles a year between its eight assigned aircraft.

The Delaware Air Guard has eight C-130 aircraft built by the Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company in
Georgia. Seven aircraft were built in a production line that began in 1984 and finished in 1986, and
delivered fresh from the factory to the New Castle unit in 1985 through 1986. Six aircraft were delivered
in 1985; these are aircraft tail numbers 207 through 212. Aircraft #213 was delivered in January 1986.

Fleet flying hours for the eight C-130 aircraft of the Delaware ANG 142nd Airlift Squadron:

Aircraft # -- current hours (for all eight unit C-130 aircraft) as of June 4, 2008:

207 -- 9,640.4 hours
208 -- 8,815.5 hours
209 -- 9,803.4 hours
210 -- 9,939.8 hours
212 -- 9,976.2 hours
213 -- 9,998.8 hours (reached 10,001.3 hours on June 5, 2008)
1057 -- 6,419.3 hours (1990 MODEL)

Key Airmen involved in 10,000 hour milestone flight:

One crew chief -- Tech. Sgt. Scott Nybakken, a resident of Wilmington, Del.

The five aircrew:

Aircraft commander and pilot - Maj. Tim Casey, a resident of Bear, Del.

Pilot -- Col. Jonathan Groff, commander, 166th Airlift Wing, a resident of Downingtown, Pa.

Navigator - Capt. Mark Linzmeier, a resident of Middletown, Del.

Flight engineer - Tech. Sgt. John DeFrancesco, a resident of Norwood, Pa.

Loadmaster - Senior Airman Philip Harris, a resident of Dover, Del.
Sources:
Department of the Air Force, Air Force Historical Research Agency, Maxwell AFB, AL
USAAS-USAAC-USAAF-USAF
Aircraft Serial Numbers--1908 to Present:
http://www.joebaugher.com/usaf_serials/usafserials.html
Aviation Archaeological Investigation and Research, AAIR Database:
http://www.aviationarchaeology.com/
Delaware Military History